Péter Krekó

Director, Political Capital Institute

Hungary
English, Hungarian

Director, Political Capital Institute

Hungary
English, Hungarian

Recent activity

By Péter Krekó

Political Trolling in Hungary


With the 2019 Hungarian municipal elections approaching, disinformation campaigns and trolling activity will play an increasingly prominent… Read more

By Péter Krekó

The Kremlin’s Image Through Online Conversations


In 2019, three years after the Kremlin carried out its infamous disinformation campaign in the 2016 US… Read more

By Péter Krekó

‘Conformation Bias’: Political Tribalism as a Driver of Disinformation


Those who study disinformation as a phenomenon often view persistent belief in propaganda and conspiracy theories as… Read more

By Péter Krekó

The Authoritarian Capture of Social Media


The beginning of the twenty-first century was dominated by overwhelming consensus that the internet was an autocrat’s… Read more

Biography

Peter Kreko is a social psychologist and political scientist who is the director of the Political Capital Institute, a position that he has held since 2011. He focuses on Russian ‘soft power’ policies and political populism and extremism in Europe. From 2016-2017, Peter worked as a Fulbright visiting professor in the United States at the Central Eurasian Studies Department of Indiana University. He was the co-chair of the PREVENT working group at the EU Radicalisation Awareness Network (RAN), and is currently an expert member of the EU RAN Centre of Excellence. He is a regular commentator for various media outlets, and has written articles for Foreign Affairs, Financial Times, and Newsweek, among others. His book on the Hungarian Far-Right was published in 2017 at Ibiden Verlag/ Columbia University Press, and he also wrote a book on the social psychology of conspiracy theories and fake news (in Hungarian) that was published in 2018. He is the member of the presidential board of the Hungarian Political Science Association. He received his PhD in 2014, and wrote his thesis on the social psychology of conspiracy theories.

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