Saiph Savage

Assistant Professor, West Virginia University and Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM)

United States
English, German, Spanish

Assistant Professor, West Virginia University and Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM)

United States
English, German, Spanish

Recent activity

By Saiph Savage

Native Americans and the Threat of Computational Propaganda


Disruptive social media accounts are appropriating images related to Native Americans and exploiting them through computational propaganda.… Read more

By Saiph Savage

How is Digital Propaganda Targeting Hispanics in the 2018 US Midterm Elections?


This article is part of the DisinfoPortal’s #StratComDC article series. You can watch #StratComDC here. How is digital… Read more

Biography

Saiph Savage is an assistant professor of Computer Science at West Virginia University (WVU) where she directs the Human Computer Interaction Laboratory (HCI @ WVU Lab). She is also a visiting professor at the the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), a J. Wayne and Kathy Richards Faculty Scholar, and an adjunct professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Her research in social computing and crowdsourcing focuses on understanding how citizens produce collective action in the wild using current socio-technical tools; she then uses this knowledge to design novel systems that spark better coordination of citizens and empower communities to reach more complex goals. Her systems have been used to fight corruption and misinformation in Latin America, as well as to power better collaborations between Mexican immigrants and governments to transform rural towns. She has authored and co-authored publications at premier venues in human computer interaction (HCI), including ACM CHI, ACM CSCW. Saiph has been recognized with the Conacyt-UC MEXUS Doctoral Fellowship, and the Google Anita Borg Scholarship. She is also a member of Microsoft’s BizSpark, and the director of the Anita Borg Community powered by Google. Her work has been covered by various outlets, including the BBC, MIT Tech Review, and Vice News. She holds a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering from UNAM as well as a masters and PhD in computer science from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Contact